Lee Min Ho Talks About His Passionate Kiss Scene With Park Shin Hye in “The Heirs”


Actor Lee Min Ho recently sat down for an interview with Daily Sports and talked about what it was like to work with Korea’s sweetheart Park Shin Hye and having to wear high school uniforms again. 

How was it working opposite Park Shin Hye? 

“Park Shin Hye is young in age, but in terms of acting experience, she is my senior. To be honest, I’m not exactly good at talking to female actresses about acting or offering them support. I just act according to how I feel, and I’m just thankful that Park Shin Hye goes with it. I also discovered that Park Shin Hye is the first younger female actress I’ve worked with. Until now, I’ve worked with older actresses like Goo Hye Sun and Kim Hee Sun. I think she’s a terrific colleague and consider her a younger sibling.” 

Compared to “Boys Over Flowers,” how did you control or direct your acting style and tone?

“From the beginning, I told myself not to worry about it too much while filming ‘Boys Over Flowers.’ I kept thinking, ‘How does a second-generation chaebol hold his chopsticks?’ and ‘I have to look at people as though they amount to nothing but insects to me’ while acting. This time, I tried to genuinely express human nature and my true self. Since I have played a similar character before, I definitely became worried about it. But that soon went away after I decided to just play it off comfortably. That’s when I think a more natural character began to emerge.” 

Park Shin Hye said about your guys’ kiss scene, “I didn’t know we’d actually do it.” 

“Since the kiss was the culmination of all the events and emotions leading up to it, there was no other alternative than to do it for real. I felt sorry that Park Shin Hye wasn’t told beforehand. Usually, female actresses are accommodated to a certain extent. So I think Park Shin Hye was caught off-guard by how it played out.” 

Was there a reason you decided to play a second-generation chaebol high school student again? 

“I’ve received the same question from a lot of people asking, ‘Why didn’t you play the same role again?’ However, I was thinking, ‘I’ll never be in my twenties again anyway, nor will I look or give off the feeling of being in my twenties.’ Until you reach the age of 26 or 27, you are familiar with the gap and transition between boyhood to manhood. I’d like to be able to use that remnant emotion and ability to relate to that period while I still can, and play the character the public is searching for.” 

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