Seo Taiji Building “Seo Taiji Mania Forest” in Brazil


Right next to “Seo Taiji Forest,” singer Seo Taiji is building a forest of equal size called “Seo Taiji Mania Forest” as part of “Be the Green Project.”

On January 2, Seo Taiji’s agency Seo Taiji Company revealed, “We have been preparing for the creation of ‘Seo Taiji Mania Forest’ and will launch the actual tree planting [this month].”

Through “Be the Green Project,” Seo Taiji hopes to join in solidarity with his fans for the cause of environmental preservation as well as show appreciation for their loyalty and support. The idea for the name of the project came from “Poignant Memories,” a song in his ninth album.

In 2012, Seo Taiji’s fans chose to honor the 20th anniversary of his debut by  funding the construction of “Seo Taiji Forest” in Guapi Assu region. They purchased a plot of land from Guapi Assu reserve to plant trees and restore its threatened habitat. Moved by their gift, Seo Taiji has been constructing another forest 20 kilometers away from “Seo Taiji Forest,” which will be called “Seo Taiji Mania Forest,” as a shout out to his fans.

seo taiji mania forest

Seo Taiji had a long time interest in environmental issues. In 2009, he launched a campaign called “A Difference in Temperature That Changes the World,” with the aim of protecting polar bears. In November of 2013, Seo Taiji was in talks with World Land Trust and REGUA about the condition of the forests and its restoration plans. The following December, Seo Taiji Company sent representatives to Brazil in order to scope out the plot on which “Seo Taiji Mania Forest” would be built.

Seo Taiji broke the news about “Seo Taiji Mania Forest” on December 30, the first day of his band’s 2014-2015 national tour “Quiet Night.” Through a video, he sent a message of appreciation to fans, adding, “‘Seo Taiji Mania Forest’ is a gift to fans and also a gift to Earth.”

Meanwhile, Brazil’s forests are considered the lungs of Earth. Guapi Assu region, on which “Seo Taiji Mania Forest” will be located, hosts Brazil’s Atlantic Forest. This biodiversity hotspot, however, is fast becoming a wasteland, sparking restoration efforts.